On Monday, April 8, 2024, people in Delaware County and other areas within a 124-mile-wide swath of Ohio will be able to experience the totality of a solar eclipse. State planners anticipate that those traveling to and through Delaware County on the day of the eclipse could double the county’s population.

The Delaware County Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Management is working with a variety of governmental and private-sector stakeholders to ensure that plans are in place to address this influx of visitors and the potential strain on resources and emergency response services. This local group of planners will issue bulletins each month to guide the planning efforts of individuals and organizations who may be impacted by this event.

Whether you plan to take in this rare occurrence from Delaware County, provide services to spectators, or maintain everyday operations, please sign up to receive email notifications when new planning bulletins are posted.

Click here to sign up for email notifications.

LATEST BULLETIN
WHAT CAN YOU DO NOW? (FEBRUARY 2024)

Consider taking in the spectacle at an event in Delaware County

Several organizations in the area are planning large events on April 8 that are sure to enhance the eclipse-viewing experience. Check out this list of events from Destination Delaware County. While you’re there, you can peruse these lists of places to stay, things to do, and stuff to eat.

Get your glasses 

It is never safe to look directly at the sun’s rays, even if the sun is partially obscured. The Ohio EMA and Perkins Observatory have guides on how to safely view the eclipse. When it comes to glasses, this advice from the American Astronomical Society will get you up to speed on certification standards.

Apply for temporary campground or food service permits 

If your plans involve serving food for a charge or required donation, a temporary food-service permit may be required. If visitors will be permitted to park recreational vehicles or set up portable camping units on your property during the eclipse, you may need a campground permit. Consult this guide from the Delaware Public Health District and contact them at 740-368-1700 this month to start the process.

WHAT’S NEXT?

Start planning ahead by considering the following questions this month:

  • Does your schedule on April 8, 2024, allow for the potential increase in local travel times?
  • If you plan on traveling, have you made reservations for where you are staying?
  • Will you have the amenities or stock you need before the event? Can you order supplies ahead or have them delivered on a different day?
  • How will you and your guests/customers view the eclipse safely? Check out these safety tips from Perkins Observatory.
  • Have you shared our website with your local community organizations to spread the word about this unique event and to help your friends and family prepare?

Prior Bulletins | Email Alerts

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS:

Residents

It is never safe to look directly at the sun’s rays, even if the sun is partially obscured.

The only safe way to look directly at a partially eclipsed sun is through special-purpose solar filters, such as eclipse glasses or hand-held solar viewers.

Please consult guides for safely viewing the eclipse created by the Ohio Emergency Management Agency and Perkins Observatory.

Click here to view the Ohio EMA guide.

Click here to view the Perkins Observatory guide.

State planners anticipate that those travelling to and through Delaware County on the day of the eclipse could double the county’s population.

Delaware County EMA is working with a variety of governmental and private-sector stakeholders to ensure that plans are in place to address this influx of visitors and the potential strain on resources and emergency response services.

Start planning ahead by considering the following:

  • Does your schedule on April 8, 2024, allow for the potential increase in local travel times?
  • Will you have the amenities you need before the event? Can you order supplies ahead or have them delivered on a different day?
  • Given the potential traffic implications, some Delaware County school districts will operate under distance-learning plans on April 8, 2024. Other schools have decided to close on the day of the eclipse. Do you need to arrange for childcare?

Visitors

Plan to make reservations early. Area hotels have already seen an influx of bookings on days surrounding the eclipse.

Destination Delaware County has compiled the following lists of lodging options:

Hotels and Motels

Bed-and-Breakfast Establishments

Campgrounds

As there may be heavy traffic on the day of the eclipse, visitors are invited to come early and stay late. While you’re here, take in the big-time attractions and small-town charm that Delaware County offers. Destination Delaware County has compiled guides of things to do and places to eat.

Click here to view the guide of things to do.

Click here to view the guide of places to eat.

It is never safe to look directly at the sun’s rays, even if the sun is partially obscured.

The only safe way to look directly at a partially eclipsed sun is through special-purpose solar filters, such as eclipse glasses or hand-held solar viewers.

Please consult guides for safely viewing the eclipse created by the Ohio Emergency Management Agency and Perkins Observatory.

Click here to view the Ohio EMA guide.

Click here to view the Perkins Observatory guide.

Schools and Businesses

Given the potential traffic implications, some Delaware County school districts will operate under distance-learning plans on April 8, 2024. Other schools have decided to close on the day of the eclipse. Please contact individual school districts directly for details.

Many people are expected to travel to Delaware County to view the eclipse, and area hotels have already seen an influx of bookings on days surrounding the eclipse. Delaware County and the State of Ohio are encouraging people to come early and stay late, as there will likely be heavy traffic on the day of the event. Patrons, employees and others may experience increased travel times on the day of the eclipse, and businesses should plan ahead to reduce operational impacts.

  • Patrons, employees and others may experience increased travel times on the day of the eclipse. Does your schedule on April 8, 2024, allow for the potential increase in local travel times? Do you need to increase staffing to accommodate the influx of visitors to Delaware County?
  • Amenities including food and fuel may experience increased demand that leads to shortages. Do you need additional supplies or stock to account for the potential increase in demand? Will you have the amenities you need before the event? Can you order supplies ahead or have them delivered on a different day?

Food Vendors and Campgrounds

If visitors will be permitted to park recreational vehicles or set up portable camping units on your property, please consult the guide to temporary campground requirements and contact the Delaware Public Health District at 740-368-1700.

Click here to view the guide.

Many situational circumstances determine if a temporary food permit is required. Please consult the guide to food licenses and contact the Delaware Public Health District at 740-368-1700. If you plan to hire a food truck for your event, the guide also details how to check a vendor’s license.

Click here to view the guide.

Applications for temporary food permits must be submitted at least 10 days prior to the event.

Those operating temporary campgrounds should have plans in place by the end of February at the latest. The Delaware Public Health District requests at least 21 days to schedule and conduct a site evaluation. The evaluation must be conducted before to the permit application deadline, which is 15 days prior to the event.

Please review the guide to temporary food and temporary campground permits and contact the Delaware Public Health District at 740-368-1700 with any questions.

Click here to view the guide.