Quick Facts About Delaware County:

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GEOGRAPHY

  • Measures 457 square miles: 443 square miles are land (97 percent) and 14 square miles are water (3 percent)
  • Despite the county’s inland location, it features the most shoreline—about 140 miles—of all the counties in Ohio. This is due to the rivers, creeks, lakes and reservoirs in the county. Major waterways in Delaware County include: Scioto River, Olentangy River, Alum Creek and Big Walnut Creek. Alum Creek Lake and Delaware Lake are man-made lakes created as reservoirs along Alum Creek and the Olentangy River respectively.
  • Delaware County is located in central Ohio, due north of and adjoining Franklin County. It is bordered by Marion and Morrow counties to the north, by Union County to the west, and by Knox and Licking counties to the east.
  • The county seat is the City of Delaware. It is located 25 miles north of downtown Columbus.

POLITICAL BOUNDARIES

  • Delaware County was founded in 1808. The Ohio General Assembly Act establishing the county was adopted on Feb. 10, 1808. There is some documentation that notes the “Commencement of the county” occurred on April 1, 1808, but Founder’s Day in Delaware County is recognized as Feb. 10.
  • The county is part of the 12th U.S. Congressional District, and portions of the county are located in Districts 67 and 68 for the Ohio House and in District 19 for the Ohio Senate.
  • Delaware County is comprised of two cities (Delaware and Powell) and portions of another three cities (Columbus, Dublin and Westerville); five villages (Ashley, Galena, Ostrander, Shawnee Hills and Sunbury); 18 townships (Berkshire, Berlin, Brown, Concord, Delaware, Genoa, Harlem, Kingston, Liberty, Marlboro, Orange, Oxford, Porter, Radnor, Scioto, Thompson, Trenton, Troy) and a portion of one township (Washington).

HISTORICAL POPULATION DATA

YEAR POPULATION CHANGE (%) YEAR POPULATION CHANGE (%) YEAR POPULATION CHANGE (%)
1810 2,000   1900  26,401  -2.9%   1990  66,929  24.3%
1820 7,639 282.0%   1910 27,182 3.0%   2000 109,989 64.3%
1830 11,504 50.6%   1920 26,013 -4.3%   2010 174,214 58.4%
1840 22,060 91.8%   1930 26,016 0.0%   2018* 204,500 17.4%
1850 21,817 -1.1%   1940 26,780 2.9%
1860 23,902 9.6%   1950 30,278 13.1%
1870 25,175 5.3%   1960 36,107 19.3%
1880 27,189 8.8%   1970 42,908 18.8%
1890 27,189 -0.7%   1980 53,840 25.5%
*Delaware County Regional Planning Commission estimate

 


EDUCATION

  • Delaware County is home to these public school districts, as well as the most populous county for them: Big Walnut Local Schools, Buckeye Valley Local Schools, Delaware City Schools, Delaware Area Career Center, Olentangy Local Schools.
  • Delaware County has a presence in these public school districts but is not the most populous county for them: Centerburg Local Schools, Dublin City Schools, Elgin Local Schools, Highland Local Schools, Johnstown-Monroe Local Schools, Northridge Local Schools, North Union Local Schools, and Westerville City Schools.
  • The county is home to three private/parochial schools: Delaware Christian School, St. Mary School, Village Academy.
  • The county is home to three institutions of higher education: Columbus State Community College (Delaware Campus), Methodist Theological School in Ohio, and Ohio Wesleyan University.

 NOTABLE FACTS ABOUT OUR RESIDENTS

  • 51 percent of our adult residents have a bachelor’s degree. Delaware County is the only county in Ohio where more than half its adult residents have a bachelor’s degree. The U.S. average is 33 percent.
  • 96 percent of our adult residents have earned a high school diploma. The U.S. average is 88 percent.
  • The median family income in Delaware County is $91,936. The U.S. average is $56,516.
  • The rate of home ownership in Delaware County is 81.6 percent. The U.S. average is 62.9 percent.
  • Delaware County has been named the “Healthiest County in Ohio” by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation for the last four years and for five of the last six years. In 2018, it was ranked the No. 12 healthiest county in the U.S. by U.S. News & World Report.

COUNTY GOVERNMENT QUICK FACTS

  • Number of elected officials: 15
  • Number of employees: 1,282
  • 2018 General Fund Budget: $100.2 million
  • General Fund Revenues – 2017: $94.2 million
  • General Fund Expenditures – 2017: $91.8 million
General Fund Sources
Property Taxes 12.0%
Sales Taxes 61.7%
Charges for Services 14.6%
Licenses & Permits 1.8%
Fines & Forfeitures 0.6%
Intergovernmental 6.1%
Interest 2.6%
Miscellaneous 0.6%